SHHHHHHH!!!!!! Just don’t call it EdTech.

With $43 billion at stake for educational hardware and software, there’s a technology war going on in the classroom.

 

Key players like Google, Microsoft and Apple are paving the way for entrants, some of which we represent, to give teachers and students access to innovative classroom tech.

 

Over the last five years, we’ve grown our practice to specialize in giving upstarts their own unfair awareness advantage needed to close district contracts, grow teacher communities and engage millions of students with hands-on learning and immersive virtual reality (VR) experiences.

 

Specific within education technologies, we have built category leaders within their respective communities like Osmo, Nearpod, and ClassDojo, as well as building brands in family entertainment and educational gaming with Flybrix, Pixelberry and PlayKids.

Osmo is the award-winning leader of a new play movement, one that bridges the physical and digital worlds for the ultimate hands-on learn and play experience. Engaged prior to the company’s launch in 2014 and still engaged today, our agency designed a long-term media strategy to reach parents, families and educators. Starting at zero, Osmo is now in hundreds of thousands of households, is sold in more than 248 Apple stores around the globe, and is used in more than 20,000 schools worldwide. View our work with Osmo here.

We helped Nearpod, makers of an interactive classroom lesson planning platform, create a VR strategy and orchestrated the launch of Nearpod VR, the first of its kind virtual reality program for K-12 classrooms. The company has become the leading edtech platform that lets teachers find, create and distribute digital learning experiences, and is now used in 1 out of 10 US schools. Read more about our work with Nearpod here.

We launched ClassDojo, the educational tool to build positive behavior with her students in the U.S., to wide acclaim, helping it receive coverage across both tech (TechCrunch, The Next Web), education (Education Week, Classroom Aid) and consumer (Fast Company, Forbes, Bostinno) publications. We worked on long lead features, and saw placements in Marketplace (which was published online and broadcasted to 10M listeners), KQED, Charlotte Observer and CBS News.

 

Through our efforts and outreach, ClassDojo received several awards of recognition including a print placement in Forbes 30 Under 30 and inclusion in their “100 Most Promising Companies,” and Fast Company’s “Most Innovative Companies”.

 

Partnering with Flybrix, we promptly set out to build a bold narrative and go-to market communications strategy that differentiated them from other drone companies – all in advance of a highly-competitive holiday season. We focused on the unique “crash-friendly” nature of the drone that welcomed kids to “embrace the crash”, teaching them critical tinkering skills through trial and error. Flybrix became the first-ever crash-friendly, re-buildable drone made of LEGO® bricks that let kids (14+) build, fly, crash and rebuild their creations – all while honing STEM skills. Fybrix is now used in over 300 U.S. school as the go-to project-based learning drone. More about our work with Flybrix here.

Working with Pixelberry, we launched their mobile game High School Story which helps adolescents
and young-adults deal with the stresses of teenage life. The game received unprecedented coverage for a genre of its kind in some of America’s premier publications (Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Boston Herald), VentureBeat, Fast Company), and others and led to thousands of teens using the game to click through to cyberbullying and suicide support services within the app.

 

Through our relationship with Y-Combinator and Social Capital, we launched CodeNow, a company focused on teaching programming basics to high schoolers – particularly girls, ethnic minorities, and other underrepresented groups. The launch made headlines in Fast Company, TechCrunch, and InfoWorld and the organization expanded their programs into additional markets to include even more students in New York, Washington D.C. and the Bay Area.

 

The classroom is getting flipped. Education is changing as we know it.

 

Just don’t call it edtech….that’s too boring a term for what’s happening here.

VSC Delivers as Zume Bakes Pizza on the Way

Zume Pizza uses technology to make and deliver pizza from 100% locally sourced ingredients. Co-created by restaurant developer Julia Collins and serial entrepreneur Alex Garden, Zume Pizza is on a quest to make healthier pizza more accessible.

 

Zume engaged VSC to establish the company as a legitimate competitor and healthier alternative to Big Pizza conglomerates by delivering fresh, healthy affordable food in an entirely new way. Additional goals included driving pizza orders and investor awareness.

Our challenge was twofold: breaking into a crowded market with Big Pizza who have a multi-decade advantage and spend billions on broadcast, digital and print advertising, while also educating Americans on the harmful effects their favorite fast food was having on their long-term health.

 

How We Did It

 

Making secret sauce not-so-secret: After conducting market analysis of the Big Four contenders – Papa John’s, Little Caesar’s, Dominos and Pizza Hut – it became clear corporate pizza is pumping their pies with preservatives and artificial ingredients in order to preserve shelf life at the expense of Americans’ health.

 

Our strategy was to set Zume apart from chemical-laden competitors in Big Pizza with the launch of the world’s first Food Delivery Vehicle that bakes pizza en route. It served as our news-driven moment to tell their bigger story.

 

 

The campaign focused on Zume’s key differentiators: commitment to fresh, locally-sourced ingredients, focus on employee wellness and benefits, all made possible by their technology-driven approach to baking and delivering the very best pies.

Food first, tech second: We sought to elevate Zume’s mission of delivering healthier pizza options at a fair price by re-defining the concept of “fresh out of the oven.”

 

While other pizza chains introduced square heat bags that aimed to keep already cooked pizza from getting cold, Zume introduced a GAME CHANGER: the ability to start and finish cooking a pizza in the vehicle, as it arrives to customers’ home using GPS and Uber-like mobile logistics. We coined the term “BOTW” or “Baked on the Way.”

 

Given the technology was unprecedented, we had to educate reporters on the concept of dwell time, or the period of time a pizza is spent outside the oven while en route for delivery. Reducing dwell time enables Zume to make pizza at half the fat and 40 percent fewer calories, without chemicals or preservatives typically used to prolong shelf life.

 

Happy employees make happy meals: In the broader pizza industry, employee health and safety is a serious issue – with pizza delivery one of the most dangerous jobs in America. Part of the strategy was to expose the safety shortcomings of traditional pizza parlors, while showcasing Zume’s innovative use of technology to create a safer work environment.

Show-telling: Instead of telling reporters about Zume, we invited them in to taste the difference. VSC understood that Zume’s mission-driven business were best seen firsthand as opposed to described over the phone or via a startup tech video. That’s why we planned a series of in-person briefings at Zume headquarters to educate food, tech, and business press by showing them the synergistic collaboration between robots and employees, the use of fresh ingredients and superior cooking process. The media witnessed our innovation first-hand and tasted the pizza themselves.

 

 

Results

The relatively small startup is now the hottest innovation in the pizza industry. Through our PR efforts, one single initiative generated more earned media attention from global press (100+ articles across online, print and broadcast) than any one of the Big Pizza chains for any product launch over Q3-Q4 of 2016.

 

The launch reached 500 million people. Among that audience was the CEO of Domino’s, who was forced to respond to Zume in a Reuters article by downplaying if “people want their food out of a machine.”

 

That’s right. The CEO of Domino’s Pizza was compelled to respond to a tiny Silicon Valley startup.

 

The press embraced Zume’s pizza-making robots and mission to improve the way food is sourced, cooked, and delivered, with national media coverage in outlets like NPR and the New York Times, food media like Eater and Vice’s Munchies, and a variety of other top publications. And in February 2017, Zume was named #1 on CNBC’s Upstart 25 List, honoring the fastest growing startups of the year.

 

For example, when Domino’s launched the ability to order via Apple Watch, they only generated five noteworthy stories. Or when Pizza Hut resorted to ‘stunty’ menu offerings like the pizza topped with gold and grilled cheese crust, they earned just seven placements.

 

After the launch, Zume experienced record week-over week order volume which not only spiked for the campaign but led to overall higher order volume ongoing. The campaign generated curiosity, interest, demand and repeat customers. A supreme publicity pie, if you will.

 

Here’s what the press had to say:

 

“Meats and produce are sourced locally, like cheese from Cypress Grove and tomatoes from Scott Park Farms, and prepared on site. And, as if one needed more convincing to ditch the chains, Collins says that each slice averages 178 calories, versus 320 calories per slice at Domino’s.” — Eater SF on Zume’s superior ingredients and food first, technology second model

 

“Startups like Zume provide an important modern example of how automation can impact employment in ways that aren’t immediately apparent, or necessarily negative.” — Quartz on Zume’s robots and job creation

 

“The company is committed to using robots for repetitive, mundane tasks to eventually move kitchen staff into the front office, and shift focus to what Zume Pizza considers its marquee innovation, a truck with more than 50 ovens that cooks pizzas while they’re out for delivery using special software.” CBS News on Zume’s commitment to worker safety

 

We also connected reporters with Zume pizza employees directly so that they could tell their story about the company’s commitment to their livelihoods. For example, Christopher Rognstad, Zume Pizza’s kitchen supervisor, spoke with Marisa Kendall, a reporter with the San Jose Mercury News and said: “I think there will always be a place for humans here,” to “We jokingly talk about the robots as if they’re our family and our co-workers,” Rognstad said. “So when they make mistakes we joke and say, ‘Bruno messed up.’”

 

The company received hundreds of inbound inquiries from investors, potential partners and prospective employees.

Giving the Right Voice to Speech Tech: the Api.ai Speed Strategy

Speaking is the most natural way to communicate, but until recently there was a major gap between the human voice and technology. With all too many #SiriFails and Amazon Alexa shopping sprees, the process of talking with technology – whether in the home, car or on mobile devices – was broken.

 

Everyone understood the problem, but no one had fundamentally solved it. In the last couple of years, several companies have attempted to improve voice interactions with products and services, creating a noisy market of Siri-like developer tools. Yet none had a clear point of differentiation for not only the developers building the products, but also for the consumers who relied on them.

 

To set itself apart from the plethora of voice-tech developer products, Api.ai selected VSC to achieve three strategic goals: 1) differentiate from competitors, 2) drive developer signups, and 3) draw media attention for new products that appealed to developers.

 

Our Strategy – Win on Speed

VSC’s recommendation was to beat the Big Four to the punch with developer-centric innovations that demonstrated agility and ease with giving voice to nearly any product or service.

 

We analyzed the market in terms of what already existed and what areas were ripe for innovation. It became clear that developers faced a fragmented ecosystem, one where Amazon, Microsoft, Google and Apple, made it way too hard to make conversational interfaces worth using. Thus, we focused on a developer-first message that worked for innovation and maximum benefit for consumers.

 

What We Recommended and How We Made it Happen

  • Product: Launch products exclusively for wearables, bots, automobiles, apps and the IoT.
  • Messaging: Talk about the speed at which Api.ai could deploy its AI-powered voice solutions and how easy it was to integrate with any IoT device.
  • Pedigree: Leverage Api.ai’s platform, which was backed by data from over 2 billion voice commands – making it the largest open natural language and intent response platform available.
  • Media: Set up interactive demos, ensuring key journalists could try out the new voice-enabled solutions.


A Voice Technology You Actually Want to Talk To

With speed and developer signs-up at the forefront, we proposed Api.ai launch several solutions aimed at giving what current and potential customers needed. To that end, we launched Api.ai for Slack, Api.ai for Auto, Api.ai for IoT and API.ai for Twilio.

 

It’s rare for companies of Api.ai’s size to be up for the new products we proposed, making it even more satisfying when they launch and the feature stories rolled in. Through exclusive product innovation news placements in top media, myriad briefings with thought leaders and journalists, proactive commentary on issues around diversity and guest posts in elite tech publications, our strategies led to a fast-paced rhythm of coverage in top tier media.

 

Beyond developer-focused media, VSC specializes in up-leveling B2B companies to get mainstream media coverage in unique ways. For example, we tapped into Api.ai’s own data to conduct a pop culture survey on the role of voice assistants called “Virtual Assistant Report” which focused on how consumers use and feel about digital assistants. By polling 12,000 customers, we uncovered that 39% would fall for a voice assistant if it it loved them back. We then worked with major media to cover the news including placements in the Huffington Post, Fusion and iDigital Times.

 

Results

We exceeded brand, product and PR goals, and quickly reached developers. This led to signups and momentum, investment and eventual acquisition by Google in 2016.

 

Here are a handful of the significant features throughout our time with Api.ai:

 

Inc: Meet the Startup That’s Not Afraid to Compete With Apple, Google — and Now, Facebook


“What do you do if you launch a new product, only to have Apple introduce its own version six months later? You don’t let fear get the better of you. You stay the course, and work to make the best product you can. And you start looking for areas of the market that the big boys aren’t serving. That’s the strategy that worked for Api.ai.” – Inc

 

Forbes: Adding Insight To Communications, api.ai Integrates With Twilio To Create Siri-Like Automation


“By developing a conversational interface, and making it seamless for organizations to leverage that platform within their own real-time conversational tools, API.AI will bring a heightened level of customer service and efficiency to the service function within organizations.” – Forbes

 

Programmable Web: api.ai Launches Platform Agnostic Voice Interface for Connected Cars


“The voice interface is highly customizable and capable of working with any head unit operating system. The platform includes pre-built voice interface capabilities and allows developers to build custom voice-enabled applications. api.ai has been working with automotive manufacturers as well as OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers to enable intelligent voice assistant capabilities in connected car platforms and applications. The company has also been talking with several automotive OEMs that provide open platforms and APIs for developers. The idea being to voice-enable open automotive platforms providing APIs that developers can use to build head unit applications. – Programmable Web

 

TechCrunch: Api.ai Raises $3M For Its Siri-Like Conversational UI, Makes Developer Usage Free


“The round is being led by SAIC Capital, the U.S.-based venture capital arm of China’s largest automaker, SAIC Motor. That’s noteworthy given that SAIC Capital is another backer with ties to the automotive industry, where voice driven interfaces make a lot of sense. Previous investors Intel Capital, and Alpine Technology Fund also participated, along with Motorola Solutions Venture Capital. However, the biggest news is perhaps that the additional investment is allowing api.ai to drop the fees for developers using its API, as the company switches to a business model based on large enterprise consulting and support, customisation and on-premise or private cloud installation and licensing.” – TechCrunch

 

Huffington Post: Almost Half Of Us Say We Could Fall In Love With Siri


“Siri can tell you what the weather is going to be, it can even help you plan your day but could it eventually be the one you want to spend the rest of your life with? According to research by Api.ai nearly half of us admitted that we could end up falling in love with an AI if it loved us back.” – Huffington Post

 

iDigital Times: Can Artificial Intelligence Give You The Best Wakeup Call


“A new Android only alarm clock app wants to ease the suffering. The alarm clock app – fittingly called Assistant – could change how you wake up and how you process information. Instead of an assistant, you have an app. Instead of a briefing, you peruse info during your morning routine. It streamlines your morning through artificial intelligence and machine learning to give you a curated experience based upon all the information you need for the day.” – iDigital Times

 

International Business Times: Tech Diversity: These Startups Are Breaking the Brogrammer Mold


“Api.ai, which makes conversational voice interface software that third-party developers can integrate into their apps, is one of the startups that has a Rooney Rule-like policy in place. Every time api.ai has an opening, the company includes female and ethnically diverse individuals in its pool of candidates. This is accomplished by giving serious consideration to candidates from schools that don’t typically feed into Silicon Valley. Additionally, api.ai works with TenXList, an organization that identifies top female software engineers and recommends them to tech companies when they are hiring.” – IBTimes

 

re/Code: Siri and Alexa Were Never Cut Out to Be Homemakers


“Viva la voice-enabled home! Well, not so fast. As reviews of voice-enabled technology surface, from first-party products like the Echo to third-party products integrated with HomeKit, a central point resounds: That voice enabled tech is, in fact, “quite stupid.” — original bylined article in re/Code

15 Years and 800 Steps Down the Street – Two Friends Join Forces Again

I had the pleasure of working with Archie and Julia starting in 2001at Metreon, a futuristic entertainment center located in SF’s developing SOMA district. It was the first showcase destination for emerging tech, hot gadgets, and digital entertainment experiences in a brand new, non-traditional physical retail location.

 

2001 was a crazy time and San Francisco was a startup wasteland, having shed thousands of jobs as the web 1.0 bubble burst in a big way. Sony’s timing couldn’t have been more perfect. It offered a jolt to the city and set to create a technical hub in the South of Market district, which was primarily warehouses and nightclubs.

 

Archie and Julia were all part of the team that put Metreon on the map and San Francisco back in effect from an innovation and entertainment perspective.  The movement dipped into various segments from tech hackathons (now commonplace), video game launches, major movie premieres, and Billboard Top 10 music performers.  Working together with VSC (Metreon’s PR agency of record), the team also created a Mann’s Chinese Theatre tribute for Gaming, known as the Walk of Game, to honor gaming icons such as Nolan Bushnell,  Pong,  and Super Mario, among others.

Fifteen years and 200+ clients later, VSC is still in SOMA just a few blocks from Metreon. SOMA is a changed place. It is now the Sunset Boulevard of startups. Hundreds exist here and the neighborhood is one of the most bustling and thriving business districts in the world.

 

So it feels full circle to welcome these two back. Since our time working together, they’ve amassed a depth of experience that any agency would kill for. Now, they’re bringing it back home to VSC.

 

Archie joins us as Partner and Vice President of Networks, and helps us introduce a new kind of integrated service into our mix. She’ll focus on helping our clients make strategic business connections, leveraging her network to connect them with Silicon Valley influencers and entrepreneurs. In addition to her two decades of marketing and brand development experience, Archie also offers VSC her unique perspective as a startup angel investor and real estate developer. Plus the insight she will be able to give our partners about branding, franchises, licensing and retail distribution channels is unparalleled.  Archie is also an active philanthropist, works with several amazing organizations and is a founding member of Eden, Utah-based entrepreneurial community, Summit Powder Mountain.

 

Julia is our new Director of Client Strategy. After Metreon, she joined Atomic PR, an agency that specialized early in infusing data and analytics into PR strategy. There she worked with some genre-defining tech brands in both consumer and enterprise – and saw the practice of PR shift and change through the advent of social media, infographics and data, the explosion of smartphone and app use, all across economic upswings and downturns. Advancing from account management into a role as vice president shaped both her client and business management skills, and then a move to an operations position as Atomic was absorbed by global PR firm Grayling, strengthened her experience in marketing, training & development, budgeting and team utilization. We are excited to have her bring that experience to VSC where she’ll assist account with planning, mentorship and guide marketing strategy.

 

We’re really looking forward to this next chapter opening. Speaking of which – our door’s always open, so come by next time you find yourself in SOMA.

 

Read the full press release here: http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=206311

Best Crash Ever? The Launch of the Lego-Based Drone Flybrix

LEGO®  have come a long way over the last 80+ years, but it wasn’t until this September that they’d take flight in drone form. Enter Wareness.io partner, Flybrix.

 

Introduced to us by Eric Klein of the hardware accelerator Lemnos Labs, Flybrix was co-founded by a former Nike and Adidas brand marketer and two legit Legomaniacs whose obsession for building started at MIT and Caltech, where getting creative with Lego blocks has a history.

 

LEGO®  are a century-old way for kids to learn fundamental skills like collaborative play, problem solving and planning by construction. But how could Flybrix differentiate from existing Lego-branded products, drive sales and build brand awareness in the ever-growing consumer drone market?

 

Recognizing the need for an impactful launch, Flybrix engaged Wareness.io to develop and execute the company’s go-to market communications strategy. We recognized the need to build a bold narrative that would be unlike other drone companies who conservatively messaged their stability and anti-crash features.

The data showed that drones were expected to be the go-to gift this upcoming holiday season. If we could offer the market a lower-cost drone experience than the major brands like DJI and Parrot, we had an opening.

 

With that in mind, we reverse-engineered our messaging and positioned the company as the first crash-friendly rebuildable drone made of LEGO®  bricks. We also advised Flybrix against any pre-sales or crowdfunding approaches and wait until the drones would be readily available to ship in time for the holidays.

 

The launch execution was designed to drive sales and engagement among our core constituents: hobbyists, prosumers and kids/classroom interested in STEM education. We strategically engaged the influencers and enthusiasts at global media publications with the company’s origin narrative and why Flybrix presented a major market opportunity, as well a great multi-generational bonding experience, much like our other VSC and Wareness.io partner Osmo.

 

The Flybrix™ publicity took flight and hasn’t landed since the publication of this post.

 

The launch has appeared in global media with an estimated reach of 400 million consumers, achieved 3,500+ tweets and 750k+ video views across the Flybrix™ YouTube channel and the publications that posted videos during the launch campaign.

Here’s what people love about Flybrix:

 

“But this might be the one drone toy you’ll actually look forward to crashing, since it means you get to design and build a whole new craft, and play with Lego.”

Gizmodo

 

“The best part, aside from getting to build your own drone, is probably the incredible crashability of these things… There’s never been a better time to be a good Lego-builder and a sub-par drone pilot.”

Popular Mechanics

 

“The goal is to teach pilots how to build and fly their own aerial vehicle. Or, more precisely: Build, crash, repeat.”

NBC News

Flybrix COO Holly Kasun discussing trends in the consumer drone market with Maria Bartiromo of FOX’s Mornings with Maria Live in New York City.

VSC and Wareness.io is proud to have helped Flybrix with one of the biggest consumer hardware and drone PR launches of 2016 from a publicity and sales perspective.

 

To learn more about Flybrix and enjoy Legos taking flight, go to: flybrix.com

Flybrix recently featured in AdWeek

Meet b8ta: The software-powered retailer changing the game for consumers and makers alike

When a group of Nest alums knocks on your door looking to launch a futuristic retail concept – you open it.

Through our sister brand Wareness.io, VSC has worked with a range of retail technology startups, consumer hardware and IoT companies. When we met with b8ta last fall, we knew they were on to something big – so much so we invested in them.

 

b8ta’s timing was impeccable – brick-and-mortar retail was taking a big hit, as seen with Macy’s and Walmart closing stores all across the US. Meanwhile, connected devices and the internet of things (IoT) were exploding from an online sales perspective. It was clear the physical retail industry was broken for new hardware brands making awesome products.

 

Why?

 

Ecommerce lacks a simple trait: the ability to experience products. We all know what it’s like to hear about a cool, new tech product, but are hesitant to buy because we have no way of seeing it and trying it out beforehand.

 

This is what b8ta’s core business was built upon – trying to fix these issues for both consumers and makers within the retail landscape.

 

After studying the competitive media landscape for big and small retailers, we created a comprehensive, strategic media plan to launch b8ta.

 

Our goal was to drive foot traffic to the store, as well as create awareness within the investment community, through a combination of local and national press. To so, we leveraged the store’s one-of-kind software-powered approach, sleek design and founders’ pedigrees to showcase distinction against huge corporate competitors like Apple and Best Buy. We also invited local media to the store to experience b8ta firsthand and made a national splash two days before the store opened to the public to build anticipation and capitalize on the holiday shopping rush.

 

b8ta officially launched last December, and since then has transformed the way consumers interact with products, resulting in millions of product engagements since opening its doors. It has become a prerequisite for all hardware companies and makers wanting to get into retail, and has featured customer favorites like Pepper The Humanoid Robot, Lily Drone Camera, Osmo, Teforia, goTenna, Tile and more.

 

Fast forward to today, b8ta has scaled its business and recently announced $19.5M in financing led by TriplePoint Capital, and joined by Khosla Ventures, Fifth Wall Ventures, Eniac Ventures, Graphene Ventures, and top national mall owner and operator Macerich. With the new financing, b8ta further developed its software platform and is gearing up for national expansion.

We couldn’t be more proud of b8ta pioneering a new retail model, and look forward to working with them as they open stores nationwide.

 

To learn more about b8ta, visit b8ta.com or its flagship store at 516 Bryant Street, Palo Alto, and stay tuned for the upcoming opening of its Los Angeles store in Santa Monica Place and Seattle store in University Village.

 

“[b8ta is] a unique approach to retail, one that’s pushing uphill against e-commerce trends and big-box incumbents itching to cash in on emerging tech”

re/code

 

“You won’t have to travel to the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas or be invited to a startup demo day any more to see some of the latest ideas being hatched by independent tech hardware developers.”

SV Business Journal

 

“An Apple Store-esque experience for connected gadgets? Yes please!”

Cult of Android

 

“When people come into the store, they’re able to immediately touch and interact with the products on display.”

TechCrunch

 

“b8ta…is a new startup trying out a different approach to retail.”

Forbes

 

“The new retail shop is unlike those around it and will offer unique items: It will sell the Internet of Things.”

LA Times

 

”b8ta…puts cutting-edge gadgets on its shelves within days of their release and provides sellers with instant feedback.”

MIT Technology Review

Flywheel dominates taxi-hailing app competition

VSC was selected to help reinvigorate Flywheel, a three-year old mobile taxi-hailing app platform bringing on-demand technology to the millions of taxis already on the streets of the world. Our goal was to become the definitive taxi-hailing application among competitors such as Taxi Magic, Way2Ride and Arro.

 

Flywheel Communications Strategy

Create a three horse race to stomp cockroaches.

 

Our strategy was to externally battle two horses, Uber and Lyft, while internally aiming to own mindshare specifically against other taxi-software companies (cockroaches) in order to win the massive business of 100m taxi rides a month compared to the 20m that Uber does.

 

Our analysis of relevant social media chatter showed that most of the negative sentiment around Uber focused on the perception of their company behavior, surge pricing, security, and regulations. We then focused on these areas.

 

Perception: We leveraged the anti-Uber sentiment, to position Flywheel as the “non a-hole” version of Uber. Uber was experiencing a round of negative publicity around their executive suggesting digging up dirt on journalists, launching an ad campaign in France implying that customers would be paired with “hot girl” drivers, and showing off their “God-view” functionality at an Uber event, breaching customer privacy.

 

Surge: In contrast to Uber, Flywheel never charges surge pricing, which consumers and media have been quick to criticize. For this reason, we were relentless about our “no surge pricing” and “surge free” messaging with the goal of consumers associating us as the fair, just alternative.

 

Security: Because Flywheel works with the existing taxi industry, each of their drivers comply to a high level of screening, while Uber drivers might be “slightly more checked out than the general population.” Several counts of rape, sexual assault, assault, kidnapping, DUI and even death have been filed against Uber drivers as well as cases of convicted felons passing their screening process.

 

Regulation: Uber has repeatedly faced issues with regulation because they launch service in cities prior to securing approval including San Francisco, New York, San Antonio, Vegas, Portland, etc. Flywheel, on the other hand, receives approval ahead of time.

 

Branding: In addition to leveraging Uber’s bad reputation, we attained something no other taxi-hailing app has. We partnered with San Francisco’s oldest taxi company, DeSoto Cab, painting visual representation of Flywheel across the city. DeSoto Cab, decided to ditch their name and brand entirely and rebrand themselves after Flywheel, covering all their SF cabs with the Flywheel logo.

 

Results

Flywheel has become the Taxi OS. Since our engagement, the company has grown 20% month over month as well as seen 300X downloads within 60 days of commencement.

 

We owned 70% of media coverage vs. our taxi-app competitors including 1,100+ pieces of original coverage, syndications and mentions over a 13-month period. We received national coverage highlighting Flywheel against Uber in several different lights, addressing each of our focus areas.

 

Perception: We highlighted the anti-Uber sentiment with the Flywheel CEO calling Uber an a-hole, which was published by TIME and several other top tier media outlets, generating 60+ articles and syndications on the topic. This round of coverage set the tone for 100s of other articles and mentions pouring in throughout the year. TIME Magazine: Taxi App CEO: Uber Is an ‘A–Hole’, “‘[Rakesh Mathur, Flywheel CEO]: I think the last couple of days have been pretty shocking, right? Where you’re not just being told, “Hey, I know how to violate your privacy. I do that all the time. But I’m even worse than the [National Security Agency]. I’m going to take that information and do bad things to you.” I think a–hole is probably a mild word.’”

 

Surge: On New Year’s Eve 2014-15, we launched a PR stunt entitled, #SurgeFreeNYE, which ended up being Flywheel’s single most successful day of business. Flywheel’s campaign offered $10 flat-rate rides in San Francisco, Seattle, San Diego, and Sacramento, which stood in stark contrast to most services implementing surge pricing for the holiday, which ran up bills as high as $1,000 in years previous. This stunt generated 50+ articles and syndications between 12/20/14 – 1/5/15, and resulted in reviving the conversation again this past New Year’s Eve.

 

Security: The conversation about security and background checks carried out by the taxi industry vs Uber strengthened the argument for Flywheel in nearly every article since the beginning of our campaign with sound bytes like this, “Last year, Uber came under fire more than once for having let drivers with criminal records slip through its screenings, and questions arose about whether the company should do Live Scan fingerprinting and background checks, as the taxi industry does.” Venture Beat.

 

Regulation: Flywheel is the first taxi-hailing app to secure approval on the state level in California and was recently approved for a pilot program in New York by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. They released TaxiOS, streamlining existing cab infrastructure with cloud-based technology, giving them an edge with competition like Verifone’s Way2Ride in New York. Now, in addition to the taxi-hailing technology, customers have options. They can hail a taxi through the Flywheel app, pay with the app once they hail a taxi on the street, or pay via the new cloud-based technology within the cab itself. The TaxiOS launch and infiltration to the NYC taxi marketplace generated 100+ articles and syndications between 10/22/15 – 12/27/15.

 

Branding: DeSoto Cab rebranding as Flywheel created an edge that only Flywheel has: a taxi-hailing app with a branded fleet of vehicles. This rebranding generated 400+ articles and syndications between 2/18/15 – 2/20/15. These aren’t the only taxis that work with Flywheel, but it effectively makes a unique statement in San Francisco. “A San Francisco taxi company is kicking its 82-year-old brand to the curb and renaming itself after a smartphone app in the latest sign of how mobile technology is changing the way people get a ride,” Associated Press, San Jose Mercury News.

 

Evaluation

Despite Flywheel’s funding of $30m compared to Uber’s $8.1bn, or roughly 1/300th the amount of investment, Flywheel has crushed its actual taxi competitors and is often mentioned in the broader transportation conversation with Uber and Lyft. Thanks to this campaign, Flywheel has won many more taxi partnership deals in major markets such as Portland and Los Angeles and is going on to begin trials with the New York Transportation Association, expanding into the nation’s premier taxi market.

 

Read more about Flywheel here