VSC Delivers as Zume Bakes Pizza on the Way

Zume Pizza uses technology to make and deliver pizza from 100% locally sourced ingredients. Co-created by restaurant developer Julia Collins and serial entrepreneur Alex Garden, Zume Pizza is on a quest to make healthier pizza more accessible.

 

Zume engaged VSC to establish the company as a legitimate competitor and healthier alternative to Big Pizza conglomerates by delivering fresh, healthy affordable food in an entirely new way. Additional goals included driving pizza orders and investor awareness.

Our challenge was twofold: breaking into a crowded market with Big Pizza who have a multi-decade advantage and spend billions on broadcast, digital and print advertising, while also educating Americans on the harmful effects their favorite fast food was having on their long-term health.

 

How We Did It

 

Making secret sauce not-so-secret: After conducting market analysis of the Big Four contenders – Papa John’s, Little Caesar’s, Dominos and Pizza Hut – it became clear corporate pizza is pumping their pies with preservatives and artificial ingredients in order to preserve shelf life at the expense of Americans’ health.

 

Our strategy was to set Zume apart from chemical-laden competitors in Big Pizza with the launch of the world’s first Food Delivery Vehicle that bakes pizza en route. It served as our news-driven moment to tell their bigger story.

 

 

The campaign focused on Zume’s key differentiators: commitment to fresh, locally-sourced ingredients, focus on employee wellness and benefits, all made possible by their technology-driven approach to baking and delivering the very best pies.

Food first, tech second: We sought to elevate Zume’s mission of delivering healthier pizza options at a fair price by re-defining the concept of “fresh out of the oven.”

 

While other pizza chains introduced square heat bags that aimed to keep already cooked pizza from getting cold, Zume introduced a GAME CHANGER: the ability to start and finish cooking a pizza in the vehicle, as it arrives to customers’ home using GPS and Uber-like mobile logistics. We coined the term “BOTW” or “Baked on the Way.”

 

Given the technology was unprecedented, we had to educate reporters on the concept of dwell time, or the period of time a pizza is spent outside the oven while en route for delivery. Reducing dwell time enables Zume to make pizza at half the fat and 40 percent fewer calories, without chemicals or preservatives typically used to prolong shelf life.

 

Happy employees make happy meals: In the broader pizza industry, employee health and safety is a serious issue – with pizza delivery one of the most dangerous jobs in America. Part of the strategy was to expose the safety shortcomings of traditional pizza parlors, while showcasing Zume’s innovative use of technology to create a safer work environment.

Show-telling: Instead of telling reporters about Zume, we invited them in to taste the difference. VSC understood that Zume’s mission-driven business were best seen firsthand as opposed to described over the phone or via a startup tech video. That’s why we planned a series of in-person briefings at Zume headquarters to educate food, tech, and business press by showing them the synergistic collaboration between robots and employees, the use of fresh ingredients and superior cooking process. The media witnessed our innovation first-hand and tasted the pizza themselves.

 

 

Results

The relatively small startup is now the hottest innovation in the pizza industry. Through our PR efforts, one single initiative generated more earned media attention from global press (100+ articles across online, print and broadcast) than any one of the Big Pizza chains for any product launch over Q3-Q4 of 2016.

 

The launch reached 500 million people. Among that audience was the CEO of Domino’s, who was forced to respond to Zume in a Reuters article by downplaying if “people want their food out of a machine.”

 

That’s right. The CEO of Domino’s Pizza was compelled to respond to a tiny Silicon Valley startup.

 

The press embraced Zume’s pizza-making robots and mission to improve the way food is sourced, cooked, and delivered, with national media coverage in outlets like NPR and the New York Times, food media like Eater and Vice’s Munchies, and a variety of other top publications. And in February 2017, Zume was named #1 on CNBC’s Upstart 25 List, honoring the fastest growing startups of the year.

 

For example, when Domino’s launched the ability to order via Apple Watch, they only generated five noteworthy stories. Or when Pizza Hut resorted to ‘stunty’ menu offerings like the pizza topped with gold and grilled cheese crust, they earned just seven placements.

 

After the launch, Zume experienced record week-over week order volume which not only spiked for the campaign but led to overall higher order volume ongoing. The campaign generated curiosity, interest, demand and repeat customers. A supreme publicity pie, if you will.

 

Here’s what the press had to say:

 

“Meats and produce are sourced locally, like cheese from Cypress Grove and tomatoes from Scott Park Farms, and prepared on site. And, as if one needed more convincing to ditch the chains, Collins says that each slice averages 178 calories, versus 320 calories per slice at Domino’s.” — Eater SF on Zume’s superior ingredients and food first, technology second model

 

“Startups like Zume provide an important modern example of how automation can impact employment in ways that aren’t immediately apparent, or necessarily negative.” — Quartz on Zume’s robots and job creation

 

“The company is committed to using robots for repetitive, mundane tasks to eventually move kitchen staff into the front office, and shift focus to what Zume Pizza considers its marquee innovation, a truck with more than 50 ovens that cooks pizzas while they’re out for delivery using special software.” CBS News on Zume’s commitment to worker safety

 

We also connected reporters with Zume pizza employees directly so that they could tell their story about the company’s commitment to their livelihoods. For example, Christopher Rognstad, Zume Pizza’s kitchen supervisor, spoke with Marisa Kendall, a reporter with the San Jose Mercury News and said: “I think there will always be a place for humans here,” to “We jokingly talk about the robots as if they’re our family and our co-workers,” Rognstad said. “So when they make mistakes we joke and say, ‘Bruno messed up.’”

 

The company received hundreds of inbound inquiries from investors, potential partners and prospective employees.